Dixie Funeral Home

Dixie Manor
In 1935, the house was photographed for the Historic American Building Survey (HABS).

Although last used as a funeral home, the house was originally built as a private residence for a prominent physician and his family. The couple had eight children, three of whom tragically died young. They also raised his wife’s orphaned brother. Their daughters went on to marry wealthy district attorneys or state senators. One of his sons served as an officer in the Civil War. In 1859, after the physician’s death, the house was inherited by one of his sons. A few years later, in 1862, tragedy struck after a member of the family known for sleepwalking fell from the porch balcony becoming paralyzed. After the Civil War, the property was sold to a craftsman who operated a furniture store. Like the previous owner, a son inherited the home after his death.

Funeral Home
Constructed in 1840, this is one of the oldest surviving Greek Revival houses in the county.

Funeral Home

Funeral Home
In the 1950s, the house sold to an undertaker that renovated the house for use as a funeral home.
Funeral Home
For decades, the family operated a funeral business downstairs and lived upstairs. The owner died in 1992. Soon after, the family decided to close the funeral business. His wife continued to live in the house until her death in 2004.
Funeral Home
In 2017, a wind storm damaged the roof and broke several windows. The storm damage was exacerbated by Hurricane Michael a year later.

Funeral Home

Dixie Manor

Funeral Home

Funeral Home

Funeral Home

Funeral Home
An upstairs bedroom shows the extent of the water damage. Chunks of plaster from the ceiling cover the floor.

Funeral Home

Dixie Manor
A local preservation group is supporting the effort to restore the house. Since the storms, the city has made numerous attempts to contact the out-of-state owner. Sadly, little has been done to fix the storm damage as the house continues to deteriorate.

 

10 Replies to “Dixie Funeral Home”

  1. There is a very intriguing ‘History Channel’ Documentary put out in the year 2008, titled ‘Life without People’. That I as an admirer of images of abandoned abodes really enjoyed watching, it’s about the time line of how long the natural world in only which plants, trees and animals of nature only reside upon planet earth. How long it takes plants and trees by way of bird dropped seeds and creeping roots expand in cracks of walls and concrete to reclaim buildings and homes. It based upon if all of mankind was removed, as in was to suddenly vanish. An amazing document you may wish to watch. I especially enjoyed the rusting old car. As for sleep walking, it is a hazardous condition indeed. Thank you kindly for providing yet another presentation of the past through past southern generations. You wouldn’t know of the year, make and model of that old car would you? I would like to on line search what it looked like showroom new at the car dealer.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks Larry Davis – I guess that open back door throw me as well as the worn chrome trim around the rear window. Not to mention I wasn’t out of the box (born) yet for another five years. 🙂

    Like

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