Charity Hospital

Charity Hospital was once considered the safety net of New Orleans. It was a place where anyone could go and receive the best healthcare available. Established in 1736, by a French shipbuilder, whose dying wish was to fund a hospital for the poor. The first hospital building opened a year after New Orleans was founded in a small cottage located in the French Quarter. Charity Hospital quickly outgrew that facility and a handful of temporary hospitals sprung up around New Orleans. The administration was taken over by the Sisters of Charity, a group of Catholic nurses who would run the hospitals along with the Medical College of the University of Louisiana. By the 20th Century, New Orleans was rapidly growing and indigent care again exceeded Charity’s capacity.

Lelands Iphone 255.JPG
From the rooftop the sunrise peaks out from behind Charity Hospital.

Charity Hospital

Charity Hospital

Lelands Iphone 321
Today the hallways of Charity Hospital remain dark and empty.

In 1939, the Governor commissioned a new Art Deco-style 2,680 bed hospital tower on Tulane Ave in the heart of the Central Business District. Charity Hospital became the second largest hospital in the country encompassing a million square feet. It was known as a teaching hospital, a place where students from LSU and Tulane University could receive medical training. Designed by the same architects that built the Louisiana State Capitol, the building’s cornerstone lists the Public Works Administration as the building’s authority. Before it closed, Charity Hospital served over 100,000 indigent citizens each year. Charity Hospital was the second largest and longest continually running hospital in the country until August 2005.

16333260402_2889f26596_k
Charity Hospital in 2015.
Lelands Iphone 257
Surgeon records from the 1960s.
Lelands Iphone 302
The laboratories remain stocked with chemicals and supplies.
Lelands Iphone 319
Some portions of the hospital still had power 10 years later.
Lelands Iphone 300
The labs looked like someone walked out and left yesterday.
Lelands Iphone 294
A communications board at a nurses station reflects the feelings of those caught in Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath.
16143692059_53a1bdb8b8_k
In the Infectious Disease department,  heavy-duty microscopes coupled with the Louisiana humidity slowly bend a wooden table.

Charity Hospital

16141327918_80afe3e79b_k
A cart sits in the Pathology lab full of containers intended to be taken to the Morgue.
Charity Hospital
Several labs are still stocked with discarded body parts piled on shelves.
24221191895_fe45bdc5fa_k
Hurricane Katrina signs posted in a dark, moldy hallway by the former staff.
Lelands Iphone 265
The gym on the top floor was piled with debris and hardly recognizable.
Lelands Iphone 267
MRI brain scans were plastered across a window to view.

The levees broke on August 29, 2005 as Hurricane Katrina made landfall. The Central Business District downtown flooded immediately causing Charity Hospital to lose power. The electrical and mechanical equipment was underwater in the basement. The basement morgue flooded as well, sending bodies floating down the basement hallways. Doctors instructed the staff to pull the bodies out of the flooded basement and stack them in the stairwells. The rising flood water trapped everyone inside for days with no power, no air conditioning, little supplies, and food. Patients were hand pumped oxygen by anyone willing to help, eventually being paddled down the flooded streets by staff to a nearby parking deck. After being carried up 7 flights of stairs they were taken by helicopter to another nearby hospital for treatment. Several patients died in the parking deck waiting to be rescued. A week after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans the last patient was finally evacuated.

16380493322_04410010fd_k
These plastic tubs were full of body parts dry rotting from the heat inside.
16330177055_78e3143bfb_k
Trapped inside without food for days, starving patients and employees ate whatever they could find.
16144292467_6140c457ca_k
The dark, decaying hallways were littered with medical equipment like this CPR dummy set up to stand guard.

After the severe flooding, questions loomed regarding Charity’s future. The hospital had never been closed and many thought it would instantly reopen. Three weeks after Hurricane Katrina, the Army Corps along with FEMA volunteers had Charity Hospital back operational and ready to open. FEMA had generators set to be delivered to restore power however LSU representatives along with then Governor Kathleen Blanco blocked the delivery multiple times and ordered the power turned off at the grid. Governor Blanco stated Charity Hospital would never reopen as a functioning hospital again. Hospital police forced out volunteers and staff, locking the doors without warning.

Lelands Iphone 263
The law library survived appearing untouched with shelves of legal books.
Lelands Iphone 287
Patient waste remains throughout some hospital floors.
Lelands Iphone 254
A wooden wheelchair stored in an exterior stairwell next to a pile of biohazard waste.

Over the next 10 years a bitter battle ensued between FEMA and LSU representatives about the amount of damage inside Charity. In order to qualify for FEMA compensation the disaster damage had to exceed half the cost of rebuilding. LSU wanted out of the indigent healthcare business, hoping the closure of Charity would allow them to move on. LSU had been working to move towards a more privatized health care operation and wanted a new, state of the art facility outside of the downtown area. The closing of Charity allowed LSU to seek the government funds needed to help build a billion dollar medical complex outside of the downtown area.

Lelands Iphone 271
The staff dorm rooms on the upper floors showed the most decay with windows broken and paint melting off the walls.
Lelands Iphone 295
A corner operating room with a view of the city.
Lelands Iphone 312
Since Charity was a teaching hospital the labs were full of oddities like this partial skeleton.
Lelands Iphone 298
Lab manuals, blood slides, and a large hypodermic needle lay across this Pathology lab desk.
Lelands Iphone 329
The turn-of-the-century autopsy amphitheater in the pitch black basement.
Lelands Iphone 327
You can still see the water line from Hurricane Katrina on the basement walls.

University Medical Center, was completed in 2015 at a cost of $1.2 billion. A replacement for Charity that seemed almost too little, too late. The state of the art facility features far fewer psychiatric beds and will not have birthing units. The 70 acre site in lower mid city is split off from downtown by the interstate highway making it difficult to reach by the indigent population. Many of the historic homes that outlasted Hurricane Katrina were destroyed or moved to less desirable areas to make way for University Medical Center. The city of New Orleans used the power of eminent domain to take over the land for the new hospital while continuing to pay over $3 million a year to secure the 70 year old Charity Hospital as it sits dormant. Over the years, ideas for reuse such as a City Hall or medical student apartments were suggested but quickly put to rest. Today Charity Hospital remains abandoned and locked down under constant police patrol. Hopefully one day this Art Deco treasure will be filled again with thousands of people creating miracles and saving lives.

Advertisements

86 thoughts on “Charity Hospital

    1. Just think – for a second – about trying to modernize a building from the early 20th century for modern needs such as computer wiring and wifi, not to mention patient privacy. The building served its purpose. It was time to modernize. It just wasn’t charming anymore.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. I worked at Charity as a faculty member in ortho for 25 years. It was an anachronism and a disgrace. Dirty , and unsafe for patients , residents poorly supervised and unaccountable. The storm did a huge favor to the peopkle of New Orleans and medical education by terminating the hospital and allowing a modern facility to replace it.

      Liked by 2 people

    3. Not sure how to post here, but the fact that there will be less psychiatric beds is the most disturbing part of this whole story. I have known people who, at their wit’s end have tried to get help, with hospitals turning them away into the danger of the night. And I mean that literally. There must be understanding that mental illness is really physical illness, bu tin the brain.

      Liked by 4 people

    4. i almost died in that hospital on my 33rd birthday.

      infact i may have and my father might not have told me.

      but i have to say, what? 11 years later, after the hurricane

      all the funds in the world, billions spent, some of it went to roads

      and this place, was politically abandoned because of loss?

      imagine if only a fraction of those katrina funds were used for charity.

      what it would have done.

      but only a fraction was used for roads, most of which on the northshore

      and the rest, pocketed away. as usual.

      unreal, when you see these photos.

      and i almost died (if i didn’t die and come back) on my 33rd birthday

      about less than 11 months before katrina)

      ~peace

      thomas 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. The surgical amphitheater is NOT in the basement. It’s on the 9th floor. It’s also not pitch black. Please correct your huge description error. The flood waters did not reach the surgical amphitheater. This is misinformation.

    Also, a lot of the dummies were placed there by police who use the building since Katrina for urban tactical drills.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The amphitheater pictured is located behind the Morgue in the basement. It’s there, I promise! There are other amphitheaters located in the hospital too. I remember seeing one with blue tile on another floor, maybe that’s the one you are referring to!

      Liked by 2 people

      1. When did you visit the hospital to get these pictures? Is there really medical waste and body parts still sitting around? That just seems insane to me. If so, it seems like they would be cleaning the hospital out and removing records, chemicals, and bio hazards… This story makes me sad.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Yes I just spoke with my father who worked there and he confirmed there were two amphitheaters. One in the basement that adjoined the doctor’s dining rooms and the morgue, and another amphitheater that was on the upper 7 or 8th floor. It had fabulous pictures of old surgeons including the famous New Orleans surgeon Rudolf Matas, one of the founders of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, operating with a cigar in his mouth. The smoke was then believed to clean sounds! There used to be a tunnel to the Tulane medical school. On Fridays next to to the kitchen across from the morgue was a large 4 ft wide and tall cast iron pot where they had gumbo being stirred every Friday. It was shut down after an “expose” in the Times Picayunne! What happened to those patients, doctors, nurses, and staff in the aftermath of Katrina due to government ineptitude was a truly heinous crime.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Upon a recent trip to NOLA, I was awestruck by the huge white. abandoned building….looking like a large ghost looming over the new hospital across from it…It looked so out of place and SAD…yes, SAD. Abandoned after all it’s years of care and charity for this great city. I was also SAD.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. It is really sad to see such an iconic hospital let go to waste because of politics and not wanting to serve the poorer people of New Orleans. At what point does political clout take precedence over human life. Building another hospital that is not accessible to the poor, is a pure and outrageous jester that the poor has no value as human beings. It also reinforce the concept that the poor people are not worthy of receiving basic health care, which the indigent people (and all) have a right to medical care regardless of their financial or social status. Those people who directly denied the rebuilding of Charity Hospital, who deliberately made sure that the people in all areas, especially the people who reside in the predominately poor area, should be ashamed of themselves. Nothing of good will come to those who did this great injustice….and yet found funds to build a hospital to serve its select few. There is a saying that: “God is a God of mercy” and that He will look over and take care of those who can’t care for themselves ….to those who have political clout and not given one thought of those less fortunate…..shame on you….remember karma is real; and when you look down your nose at those less fortunate, one day you may be in that position…never forget this thought…going up the ladder of success is one thing, but falling down that you will see all those people you insulted with your decisions and heartlessness. IJS

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Why do people claim the new LSU Medical Center is not accessible to the poor? It is very accessible and is utilized by people with and without insurance constantly. As I actually work at the LSUMC, I can tell you we are always busy and are always being accessed by everyone who has a need. Please don’t make statements that are misleading and outright lies. From reading these posts, it sounds like there is this huge, new medical complex sitting empty, surrounded by a moat filled with alligators to keep the poor out and the golden drawbridge is only lowered to allow the Mercedes ambulances in….silly people.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s accessible. Just not by public transit like Charity. I’m sure indigent people in New Orleans still receive care, but at what cost? This new hospital cost 3 times what it would take to make Charity modernized.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. How is it not accessible by public transit?the streetcars and buses have stops there, front, & both sides. It’s incredibly accessible. Especially when you consider the huge indigent population a block away, living under the interstate.

        As for the lack of psychiatric beds, it’s an incredibly advanced psychiatric ward.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. The issue I believe had to do with the homeless and indigent walking to the new hospital facility which is divided by an interstate from where Charity is located. Not sure what public transit issue you are talking about? There are fewer psychiatric beds at the new hospital, all advancements aside.

        Like

      4. Abandoned Southeast, please do not take this in the wrong way, I wanted to help others that may not know the area understand it better.
        I-10 is elevated through this area. Tulane Ave. (Charity is on Tulane) and Canal St. go underneath it (The new LSUMC is between Tulane and Canal). Claiborne is the city street that runs underneath I-10 in this area. There are plenty of people who walk along Canal and Tulane under I-10. There is a homeless population that lives under I-10. The homeless and poor have access to reach the new LSUMC by foot and by bus, as well as the streetcar if they have the fare for it.There are plenty of bus stops along Canal and Tulane that are in front of the new LSUMC. The new LSUMC is literally on the other side of I-10 from Charity Hospital, we are talking about blocks, not miles. Though I am not a native New Orleanian, the city has been apart of my life the last 8 years, with me living there and being active across the metro area for the later 4 and half years.

        Like

  4. The photo of “Surgeons records from the 1960’s” caught my attention right away. I was a patient at Charity during the early 60’s and have often wondered if there were any medical records remaining from that time period. I also think that there’s a misconception that Charity only serviced the poor when in fact people from all walks of life were patients here simply because the doctors and medical staff at Charity were often on the cutting edge of new surgical procedures and technology. What a shame to allow this hospital waste away. Many a good doctor, nurse, etc. learned here…worked here…taught here. So sad…

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You are absolutely right. The cutting edge doctors here had, gave me a wonderful life. I am so glad that I was given a chance by the doctors here in order for me to live the way I do and to have a chance at getting married and having a family of my own. I was one of their miracles.

      Liked by 3 people

  5. This site has some misguided statements. LSU does not want “out of the indigent healthcare business.” They wanted a new facility because Charity was so old, and it’s construction of mostly concrete made modern updates very difficult – they literally had to run internet, power, and cable wiring outside the building. As mentioned above, Jindal was the driving force behind privatizing Louisiana healthcare, but even with privatization, LSU still serves the indigent in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Shreveport, and various other cities. The statement “After Charity’s closure, suicide rates tripled across New Orleans” indicates the closing of charity lead to these suicides. It was clearly the devastation of Katrina itself that lead to the rise in rates, not to mention the use of rates rather than actual suicides may be a bad statistic to use, considering the significant decrease in population, with those left behind more susceptible to suicide and depression. The idea that moving UMC literally less than half a mile away from the original Charity site makes “it difficult to reach by the indigent population” is ludicrous. I get the desire to want to make use of the building, but the aforementioned misdirection and outright lies lead me to question whether or not “Three weeks after Hurricane Katrina the Army (the Army?) had Charity Hospital cleaner than before the storm, fully operational, and ready to open.” As an LSU medical student starting in 2008, I was taught by many people that worked in Old Charity. It was not “fully operational”. One big issue was the very heavy CT and MRI machines. Charity only had the structural strength to hold these large machines on the first floor, making them vulnerable to any recurrent flooding. These were not replaced, and the hospital was far from “fully operational”. I understand the misgivings about the eminent domain, as well as the desire to make use of the building, but this is far from a black and white situation.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree the issue with Charity is far from black and white. Charity as a whole was not fully operational however the Army Corps of Engineers along with FEMA did clean the hospital well enough for it to be open for all intended purposes.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. My father, (who was not indigent), spent many a day looking out the window watching the superdome being built as he lay dying of cancer back in the 1970’s. I was very young and vaguely remember the large open wards with many occupied beds in each. If those wall could speak, oh, the stories they could tell…of life and death, happiness and grief. It is a wonderful building and should be restored to continue to help those many in need. It could be filled in a day with just those that need mental health. No major heavy equipment required, just people willing to show love and compassion to those most in need.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I was born at Charity Hospital and educated in the School of nursing there. Experienced the best Nursing education to be had in the country. I now teach nursing part time and am very well respected as an instructor by my students because of my experiences in the SICU and NICU of which I have worked at Charity. I am proud to wear the Charity Pin, as it is well recognized by physicians and patients. It is sad to see the the condition of that precious building. What a waste as decided by politicians. What do they truly know?

      Liked by 4 people

    2. I am a 1982 graduate of Charity Hospital School of Nursing and carry the memories of those halls deep within my heart. My class pin has been recognized outside of Louisiana and many doctors have mentioned the excellent education which came out of Charity. I did not see any mention in this publication of the fact that Charity Hospital was shared by LSU and Tulane schools of medicine. We, the nursing students, had to know which school was in charge of our assigned patients. I was devastated when Charity School of Nursing went from a 3 year diploma program to a 2 year associate degree via Delgado. I have interviewed new graduate nurses from “Charity-Delgado” and know for a fact the education changed. The day I walked out of nursing school I went directly into an intensive care unit at a hospital in my home town. This was because of my education, most new grads had to work the floor for a year before entering the ICU. We, the grads of the former Charity Hospital School of Nursing, were blessed to have received such an excellent education. FYI, the charity hospital in Baton Rouge ( Earl K. Long) is another which suffered at the hands of the LSU take over. It is now just a vacant lot.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. For all the hundreds of thousands of people treated at Charity , that could not afford to be treated any where else , The thousands who traveled from all over the world , to be treated by specialists , in this teaching hospital By teams from L.S.U. , Tulane , Delgado and many other disciplines . Charity Hospital operated in the black or in other words made a profit every year that it was open . I find it hard to believe anyone from these dedicated schools and disciplines wanted Charity to die on the vine

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Thank you for these photos and this article. Originally from New Orleans, I returned and got married in May of 2005, just 3 months before everything changed in that city. Many members of my family were treated at Charity over the years and possibly I had some that worked there, not sure, they are are mostly deceased now. Lots of fingers could be pointed but I don’t want to go there. This article makes me sad and seems like a microcosm of what came of the city as a whole. That large structure still there , I wish there was a way it could be restored and used in some way.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. There is a difference between surgical and autopsy amphitheaters. The Big C had both and they were in different locations. The autopsy theater was in the basement near the huge morgue . Many memories from my nursing school days in the late 60’s – early 70’s. So sad that it lies in such a state now. The school og nursing is now only an empty shell .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Charity School of Nursing never closed after Katrina, continuing to educate nursing students at other campuses until returning to the Education Building on South Claiborne in 2006. It is far from an empty shell! The Class of December 2015 was the second largest graduating class in the history of the associate degree program, with 158 graduates! For the Fall 2016 semester, the school anticipates approximately 650 students in the RN program, 100 in the PN program and 20 in the CNA program.
      Charity Hospital School of Nursing became Charity School of Nursing-Delgado Community College in the early 1990s. The school’s dorm was closed by the state and later renovated to provide housing for LSU’s medical students.
      Charity School of Nursing continued to maintain its ties with Charity Hospital through clinical rotations until Hurricane Katrina. Students now gain their clinical experience at hospitals throughout New Orleans and the surrounding parishes.
      Although Big Charity still awaits its rebirth, Charity School of Nursing-Delgado Community College continues a proud tradition of service far into the future.

      Liked by 4 people

  10. My father worked there as an LSU med student in the early 1970s and is now retired. I was once stitched up on a stretcher in the hallway by my dad after I fell and cut myself as a young child. I remember he once told me that “Big Charity” had a very old syphilis clinic and that he had handled records in French dating from the earliest days of that clinic. Amazing, and I wonder what ever happened to those historic records. I’d like to share this page with him, but I’m hesitant because I know it would make him very sad to see the hopsital in such decay. Of course many of us know the story of Charity’s demise, but actually seeing it like this is much different.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. That essay at the end is misguided. The indigent are much more likely to live on the side of the interstate where the new hospital is, rather than between I-10 and the river, like Big Charity. Where are you from, anyway??

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Charity was served by the Tulane streetcar and later by the Tulane trolley bus. The new hospital is served not only by the Tulane motor bus but also the Canal streetcar and the Gálvez bus.

        Like

  12. Having been born in Charity Hospital in 1987, I was a miracle baby. Back at that time they still had no idea really what thyroid disease was or how one got it. They were the first doctors who treated me for my illness. After that they sent my mom to Children’s Hospital in order for those doctors to get a handle on my health. I wish this place would be turned into something instead of sitting there as a reminder of the past and the indignity of people who gave up on a building that once held the only hope some people had. Now at 29, I have come a long way from those beginning days as a child whose parents feared wouldn’t make it or if I did what would I be like. They told my parents that I would never walk or be able to reach childhood milestones or even have children when it came to that time. I showed each doctor as a child, how wrong they were and even to this day I am still a walking true testament to the care that I was given as a newborn baby in the nursery at Charity Hospital. I thank the doctors there for giving me a fighting chance. I am grateful for the chance to live a very happy, healthy and long life because of their care and attention.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Absolutely incredible story with your wonderful images. It’s very interesting, as someone who lives in the UK, to see these amazing places you have rotting away. I know we have many of our own – but these are spectacular examples of decay and change. You are very talented at documenting it.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great Pics. Charity had it’s day. It was an outdated facility in the 80’s when I learned and trained as a med student and subsequent resident surgeon. NOLA has long had a dire need for a more up to date institution for treating patients and training health care professionals. We now have it . Katrina sped up the process. Andy King is right. The Big Charity was historically significant, but NOLA was at risk for becoming historically insignificant in medical education without its replacement. Jeffrey Sketchler, MD

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Finally, LSU has its medical center. Good, and good riddance to Charity Hospital. My experiences there at Charity during my LSU Medical School days were HORRIBLE because of this building and its deficiencies. Yes, it is a beautiful, historic, art deco structure, maybe as a residential building, not as a fully-functioning, modern hospital.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Wow. thank you for sharing, I was not aware Charity was abandoned,

    Brings back memories! No nightmares. Around day four or five post Katrina I was tasked with directing a SAR mission to extract the daughter of a high federal official who was a nurse trapped in that hospital. They were at great risk at the hospital by being over run by hoodlums and gangs. We were one of two teams that approached from different directions. Our team encountered a fire fight and were delayed in resolving that problem and then ran out of water near the Xavier University. Our other team was able to rescue her.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. No millionaires in NO who would consider renovating for apartments with maybe the bottom 2 or 3 floors for boutiques and such? I have no head for business and this may have already been looked into. Just a thought as it is downtown and with it being made of concrete, no weather worries there.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Hi😀 I’ve recently started a blog where I talk about my work experience, but mainly the experience I am currently gaining at a children’s charity called Tiny Tims that offer free treatments for young people with disabilities. I would really appreciate it if you could follow me🙂

    Like

  19. I’m reading Five Days at Memorial and the brief account of how well the staff at Charity handled the same time period post-Katrina caused me to find this site. As a RN in the Texas Medical Center I find the photos both intriguing and disturbing. Am I the only one who thinks it is time for this building to be demolished?

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Me and 3 of my friends had the opportunity to, let’s say, tour, this 1 million square foot building the other night. After hopping the fence, dodging security, cutting the lock on an exterior door, and unbolting the hinges, we were able to get in. Although the cleaning out of all the debris (which began in January) is already complete, it was still one of the coolest buildings I’ve explored. But let me tell you how sore I was the day after from climbing up 20 flights of stairs… 21 if you count the basement. I do have to say that although there are many arguments about the amphitheaters… I was able to view 2 of them, both housed on the 12th floor near the O.R. suites and anesthesia offices. They were named the Miles Amphitheatre and the Delgado Amphitheatre. While we did spend a fair amount of time in the basement, we did not find the morgue nor did we find another amphitheater… but that does not mean they are not there. One of the coolest things we did was get on the roof of the 13th floor of the west wing, and on the roof of the 20th floor (basketball court beneath us). There are so many areas we didn’t get to explore, and by 3 AM we were too tired to keep looking. We will definitely be back to this historic building.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Very interesting! I worked at Charity in the late 60’s, early 70’s as a Medical Technologist, learned so much and enjoyed it. Wish the building could be used for something! Thanks for the pictures and added info!

    Like

  22. My dad received his training in Psychiatry at Tulane Universiy / Charity Hospital in the late 50’s. I lived in NO in 1989 and often visited the cafeteria during my training for an MPH Degree at Tulane. These photos are compelling and sad…… Too bad to see all that history blown away by Katrina and neglect……

    Like

  23. Just so yall know. She is clean again!! Our company was in there 6 months ago to do a complete gut on all materials not tied down. There is nothing left but the walls and big medical equipment. There is about 30 million dollars in asbestos removal to be done before anything else can be done. Tell you what its a spooky building when your up on the 20th floor and your all alone!!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s