Outlaw House

The Outlaw House dates back to 1914. It was designed by architect George Bigelow Rogers, who designed many local landmarks including the Mobile Public Library Main Branch, Bellingrath House, and the Van Antwerp Building. The house is considered one of Alabama’s most exemplery in the Spanish Colonial Revival subset of the Colonial Revival Movement. With its thick stucco walls, arched doorways, overhanging eaves, roof brackets, and solid massing the home conveys in spirit and execution a certain Mediterranean flair. During the early 20th century, the Outlaw House was one of the few large period revival dwellings constructed in rural Mobile County.

Outlaw House

Outlaw House

George Cabell Outlaw acquired the property in 1925. It is rumored he won it in a poker game. Outlaw, along with James Arthur Morrison, founded Morrison’s Cafeteria in 1920. Morrison helped develop the cafeteria dining concept, which was unique at the time and would later become synonymous with the South. The public quickly accepted the idea of self-serve home-style cooked food offered at a modest price. At its peak, Morrison’s Cafeteria expanded to more than 150 restaurants that offered meals 365 days a year.

Outlaw HouseOutlaw House

When George Outlaw acquired the property, the house included 120 acres of land. George Outlaw built a lake on the property known as Outlaw’s Lake, which was formed around the time he acquired the estate. The lake covers over 17 acres and is up to 14 feet deep. A stone wall lines the edge of the lake. At the southeastern corner, stone steps lead down to the water. Several stone bird baths were situated around the lake. Outlaw made the lake by damming the flow of a natural spring. He used the dam to generate electricity for his house. An oil furnace in the basement provided the heat. The Outlaw House was the first in the area to have electricity and a telephone. George Outlaw was also instrumental in bringing power to other houses in the area.

Outlaw HouseOutlaw HouseOutlaw HouseIn 1940, George Outlaw, with his wife and two sons, moved to the city. In 1951, Arthur Outlaw, George’s youngest son, started working as an auditor in his father’s business. The father and son duo continued to work together, until his father’s death in 1964. Arthur Outlaw advanced to serve as the vice-chairman of the board and director of Morrison Restaurants, Inc.

Outlaw HouseOutlaw HouseArthur Outlaw renovated the old Outlaw home in the 1960s and leased the property to the Chief of Police for the nearby town. During the 1980s, Arthur Outlaw lived in the house until conflicts with him being Mayor of Mobile and living outside of the city limits forced the family to vacate the property and move within the city limits. Today, they use a portion of the land for hunting and tree farming. According to tax records, the property is still owned by the Outlaw family. Family and friends still use Outlaw Lake today. There are currently no plans to renovate the house.

Outlaw House

Outlaw HouseOutlaw House

 

 

 

Advertisements

34 Replies to “Outlaw House”

  1. I find this Spanish Colonial another favorite, as a very beautifully architectural designed abode. I love the beautiful archways and tall doors. I have through your photography discovered I do really love southern Homes, mansions and Spanish Colonials. I could live in the Outlaw house so long as there are no ghosts already residing there. I am afraid the ghosts would ask of me to leave due to my snoring. Encore please as your works are magnificent, and I myself would never get a chance to explore such southern wonders if not for you sharing of them. Thank you.

    Like

    1. I have been there recently. The place is in such terrible condition that it is just shameful! That family has enough money that it should have been taken better care of. They should be ashamed. There’s also an under ground tunnel that leads to the other house across the street. I think it was filled in at some point though.

      Like

  2. I would love to fix it up an have it as my own it’s been a dream of mine since I was a little girl, driving by it everytime we would go up 45 to my grandma’s house. O fell in love with it! It’s beautiful!

    Like

  3. I’m truly saddened by the appearance of this once gorgeous home. If they would renovate it, I would take such great care of it. It would be an honor to care for this home. My heart is broken just looking at the photos.

    Like

  4. The taxes have went from over $3000 down to less than $100 ($61 last I checked), it would seem that the house was “let go” to achieve this? I think there should be a penalty for not taking care of it.

    Like

  5. I have also looked at this house for years wondering why anyone would have just walked away from it I also have been looking at this house since I was a child I dreamed of living in it I’ve even stopped and just looked Thur the fence now it’s good to know the story

    Like

    1. Hey sis 😁. I think everyone that ever drove down 45 has wanted to live in that house. It was always like mysterious castle with fun secrets to me since I was little.

      Like

  6. I always thought this was such a beautiful house,its such ashamed that no one in the family would renovate it and live in it ..Maybe one day ,Thanks for the history lesson ,I never knew any of this .

    Like

  7. Such a beautiful place. I pass by this house on my way to Mobile quite often. I would love living in this beautiful home. Wish I could stop by and take photos of it one day.

    Like

  8. Oh my, we bought a historic home 20 miles from here to renovate. Sure wish I could’ve got my hands on this one instead!!! My first glance of this House was the summer of 79”

    Like

  9. Great photographs! One correction: The architect’s name was George Bigelow Rogers, who designed many landmarks: The Bellingrath House, Mobile Public Library Main Branch, The Van Antwerp Building, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I am from Ohio and my mother was from mobile. When we would come down for a visit when we would go to citronelle to visit cousins and my mothers sister and husband. When we passed by this house I always told my mother I would live there some day. I now live in Mobile and on my drives to citronelle I always pass by and still love the house. What a shame that it has been let go. I would love to be able to do inside sometime or even have a chance to walk the property

    Like

    1. I’ve done that recently. It’s a major disappointment. I’ve never seen the lake though. I did see the lake on the property that they owned with this line across the road. That’s the one the tunnel under ground used to go to.

      Like

      1. Who owns this place now? It saddens me of the decay inside this, once beautiful home! Always my wish and dream to see inside!!!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I played at this house a child. Rode horses and wondered the woods. The Fagerstoms lived there at the time (74 – early 80’s). The Easter Seal had their Easter egg hunt and picnic there every year. It is very sad to see it like this. The kids of Kushla, Alabama called it the Mustard Mansion. I just remember how beautiful the home was inside and out. I live 1/2 mile from the house.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. In the 1960’s my Hranny workwd for the Fagerstrom family
      I mostly went to the beautiful old farmhouse across the street. Thete was an old piano on the 2nd floor balcony. It always felt haunted to me !
      Now its just a big old pile of rotted wood. So sad.

      Like

    2. I am a grand daughter to the Fagerstroms. I hear they used to be caretakera of this home as well as the Old Outlaw place across from it. The white house with the large fishing pond, I used to live there for a while with my mother. It was Kushla then.

      Like

  12. I don’t think that anyone that has passed by the home has not dreamed of living there one day. It was so beautiful and I hate to see that the shutter have been taken off, probably stolen, and it is really sad to see the state the house is in now. I have always loved it!

    Like

  13. It was vandalized few years ago by ignorant strangers. Since it is by the highway you will not be able to leave unattended. It once was awesome. I
    don’t know if it is for sale but if so you
    Would probably get it for a good price because it will take a fortune
    to restore.

    Like

  14. They also own the house across hwy 45 . there was a tunnel under ground that connected the two houses… in the basement. I think they filled it in at some point years ago tough. I heard the basement flooded.

    Like

  15. I would love to take a look inside. Hate the family doesn’t renovate such a beautiful place. Would love to restore a place like this

    Like

  16. I can remember as a little girl passing by the out law mansion it always infatuated me growing up. Well back in 2012 my boyfriend and I decided to stop by the out law mansion and go inside it’s haunted there is a slave house in the backyard. My boyfriend and I was in the backyard and all of the sudden I got sick and threw up and when I looked up there was a figure in the upstairs bedroom. After leaving the backyard I was fine. Inside the mansion and outside of the mansion is haunted. in the attic we found a rosary necklace in front of a mirror and beside it was a mahogany frame. The place is haunted 👻🏚️

    Like

  17. As a little girl growing up the outlaw mansion always infatuated me passing by it. And the oak trees are huge. My boyfriend and I stopped by and went inside it’s haunted saw a figure in the upstairs bedroom when we was in the backyard. There’s also a BBQ pit and a slave house in the backyard. 👻🗝️

    Like

    1. I do not think it would be slave quarters as this house was built long after slavery was abolished. Not saying it isn’t- there could have been another structure there before.

      I am afraid this one is so far gone it would be really expensive and difficult to bring back. It would be nice if they would salvage anything that could be reused.

      Like

Leave a Reply to Donna g Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: