Colonel’s House

According to local historians, this historic Greek-Revival farmhouse was built in Virginia sometime between 1853 and 1856. The two-story home has 14 rooms, 12 fireplaces, an attic and an English basement. An astounding 300,000 bricks were made in a kiln on the property and used to build the chimneys and basement. The home holds quite a historic past since it is the ancestral home of a Confederate civil war colonel. After the colonel’s death in the 19th century, generations of families resided here. Over a dozen family members are buried next to the house in a private cemetery.

Colonel's House

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Colonel's House

Colonel's House

Commander's House

Commander House

Colonel's House

Colonel's House

Commander's House

Colonel House

Colonel House

Colonel's House

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Colonel's House

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Commander House

Colonel's House

Commander's House

Colonel's House

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17 comments

  1. Looking at the artifacts of daily life that were left behind, it makes you wonder what could have happened that would require such a fast and obviously disorganized exit. Family photos are still there, the kettle is on the stove, and the bed is made.

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    1. Probably an elderly man or woman was the last occupant and when they died, the family, if there is/was any, didn’t bother to take or dispose of the items left in the house.

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    1. This is the SE part of the US. A younger member of the extended family plans on restoring it and doing the same. You will need permission to view, even in the current state, as neighbors are very protective of it and their security.

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  2. Some of the artifacts and furniture in this house are definitely worth restoring. I wonder how one would go about seeking information and permission to do so?

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    1. The artifacts and furniture are very much wanted by the younger family member who plans to restore the house and grounds.

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  3. Loved your posts and the history behind them. When you post your awesome travels and pictures, I know I would love the place you’re at, like Birmingham,AL, etc. or maybe I. Missing something. Love the work you are doing for a book or just for pleasure. Whatever the case, thank you.

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  4. This was cool to see it frozen in time, like someone just left hastily. Lot’s of cool things left. What year did it seem the occupants left? Lots of older items make it seem it’s been a long time.

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  5. I would love to see this restored and brought back to it’s former glory. Many memories that were made there. The furnishings should stay with it. Thanks for your post

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  6. Glad to hear a relative has plans for it. It’s such a lovely place and too precious to let it deteriorate, and the contents.

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  7. It would be great to see a ‘before’ and ‘after’ when it comes to the restoration of the house and furniture. I love to see how it would be brought back to life!

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  8. I wish there were folks who could collect the photos and save them for genealogical reasons or turn them over to the local historical societies. Is that allowed?

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