House of the Dead

While traveling across the South from town to town, you may notice some of the finest properties are often funeral homes. The funeral profession has a long history of service provided by families with deep-rooted connections to the community. Situated in the town’s historic district, this grand Victorian mansion dates back to the late 19th century. The family-owned funeral home served the community for over a century before closing several years ago. In the 1970s, the property was added to the National Register of Historic Places. In recent years, a series of storms severly damaged the roof and blew out several of the windows causing the owners to relocate their business. Portions of the ceiling have collapsed from water damage. Most everything was left behind in hopes of one day reopening. Unfortunately, the old funeral home continues to deteriorate with no future plans of renovation. Since the property has sat vacant, homeless have taken up residence leaving personal belongings scattered throughout the parlor rooms. Among the items were smelling salts and casket brochures mixed in with old liquor bottles and togo containers. The former embalming room shows the most signs of decay, paint peels off the walls and vines creep through a broken window. The wood cabinets in the embalming room were filled with partially-used makeup as well as old chemicals. The styrofoam heads would have been used for wigs. A jar of Dodge Lip Wax sits mixed in among the old makeup and nail polish. Lip wax would hide cracks, cuts, or discolorations. The wax is easily molded and will not crumble or peel. One of the most interesting pieces of equipment left behind is the Porti-Boy Embalming Machine, manufactured by The Embalmers’ Supply Company. The glass dome holds a mix of embalming chemicals and water for dilution. A hose from the embalming machine is connected to a cannula and inserted into a cut made in the carotid artery to pump fluid throughout the heart and body. A cut made from the jugular vein drains out the blood through a tube down a drain at the foot end of the table. abandoned Victorian funeral home abandoned funeral home Funeral Parlor Funeral Parlor abandoned funeral home abandoned funeral home Funeral Parlor Funeral Parlor abandoned funeral home abandoned funeral home Funeral Parlor Mortuary Funeral Parlor abandoned funeral home Funeral Parlor abandoned funeral home Mortuary Thank you for reading. I appreciate your support. Please share the blog with your friends. If you would like to receive the Abandoned Southeast blog in your email, you can sign up below. Also, check out my books that are available through Amazon.

28 comments

      1. At least include contact info in case someone is interested in purchasing the property to save the building. There has to be a contact, or the photographer would have been trespassing.

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      2. I understand the reasoning for not disclosing exact locations of these interesting places; however it seems at least the state/county/nearby city or town, could be made known. If a homeless person is living there, guess the owners don’t care. And yes, thank you for posting these abandoned places of interest!

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      3. Clearly this isn’t a time when location was withheld to “protect” a property. The place is falling apart, and a homeless dude is trashing the place. How is the property being protected?

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      4. Think of the photographer as a reporter protecting his sources. If he were to list the locations, he/she would lose their reputation and no one would trust them to photograph their property.

        Anyone interested enough and willing to do the work, as the photographer does, can find the property themselves.

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      5. I Completely understand. That was the reason I assumed the addresses weren’t given. It’s possible to find the locations if one is REALLY dedicated to wanting to KNOW their locations.

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    1. TO THE PUBLISHER OF THESE PROPERTY’S ! IM INTERESTED IN POSSIBLELY BUYING ONE OR MORE OF THESE PROPERTY’S IN THE NEAR FUTURE FOR THE PURPOSE OF RESTORING ONE OR MORE TO ITS ORIGINAL BEAUTY ! I AM COMING INTO A LARG SOME OF MONEY AND IT WOULD BE SOMETHING I WOULD LIKE TO DO WITH A PORTION OF IT SO IF YOU RUN ACROSS ANY OF THE OWNERS THAT ARE INTERESTED IN PUTTING UP ANY OF THESES PROPERTY’S FOR SALE I GIVE YOU MY WORD THEY WOULD BE RESTORED WITH KEEPING IN MIND THE RESPECT OF THE DEAD AND DONE CORRECT AND NOT TO MAKE PROFIT BUT TO MAINTAIN THE HISTORY OF OUR GREAT COUNTY AND ITS HISTORY INTACT

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  1. I’m amazed that so many things are left behind. It’s like everyone just decided to leave and didn’t bother with their belongings. It is fascinating to see it all sitting there and at the same time, it is sad that antiques and such a lovely building were left to rot.
    Thank you for sharing these wonderful places.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A quote from one of the photos: “The owners left mostly everything behind in hopes of one day returning and reopening.”

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  2. 1. ASE generally keeps the location private because of prying eyes. Imagine of this was your property and you had snoops. Wouldn’t like it, would you?

    2. Are you going to scoop it up, make the repairs needed and keep it up to standard, since it’s on the National Register of Historic Places? Yeah, didn’t think so. And I’m thinking ASE is up and up enough to get contact information on the places he photographs and permission on said places before he photographs them and is up and up enough to not give that information out to the public.

    But both of you are probably more than welcome to travel around the Southeastern United States in hopes of trying to find these places.

    As for the homeless man: You don’t know the situation with the local authorities. Squatter’s rights is a huge deal and it has happened a few times in my hometown. Perhaps the owners are fighting to get the homeless man out.

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  3. Thank you for sharing this beautiful building. What a gift that it still has original fittings and furniture for us to see. I look forward to the next email.

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  4. It took me hours, but I have looked at every single post you have made and all the photos and history behind each of these are absolutely amazing! Thank you for sharing these 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. @Abandoned Southeast wonderful pics and awesome illustrations, i have to say I just came your work randomly but I’m very intrigued. Said I was going to sleep hours ago but I can’t put my phone down, your photos are a work of art and the historical data you collected is interesting and educational. I love what your doing please, keep up the great work.
    Also , thanks for not charging me to view your talents, and soak up ur knowledge.
    👀🧠💝

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    1. Love reading about these places. Makes me think of my grandfathers old, old home and wonder what it looks like now.

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  6. this place is actually not hard to find if you search correctly on the internet…i’ve been doing urban exploring for 11 years and have compiled my own database of over 350 places between GA, TN, AL, NC, and FL and a good 40% of my locations you can’t find anywhere on the internet, they are that secluded…however, places like this one – there are very creative ways to find the location of these thru searching online. I too never disclose the addresses of my locations because then everyone goes and then tells their friend, and their friend tells the next, and next thing you know the place is boarded up completely because of ppl disrespecting the place by graffiti or vandalism or not being discreet when exploring. I’m not even a photographer, i just love exploring abandoned places and I can tell you that I have personally located an easy 90% of the places that ASE has documented on his website. Again, it just takes creativity. You can’t just google abandoned funeral home in Georgia or abandoned Victorian house in Georgia and expect to find it. If you wan’t to find it bad enough you will search hard enough and figure out the best methods in doing so.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Ryan, do you think you can shoot me a message on snapchat @ambermersadiez
      or email me bambitheabandoned@gmail.com
      ive been urbexing for a few years and while i know you wont disclose your locations, i’d love some pointers on finding some more places 🙂
      ~Amber, 24 F, Alabama

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  7. Oooh creepy! The abandoned places are even more eerie when there are signs of people once living there. Thanks for sharing the photos — I enjoy this blog a lot. Especially during Halloween season during COVID, since we can’t go outside, this is some great virtual sPoOkY exploration.

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