Countryside Estate

According to property records, this 4,200-square-foot brick mid-century home in Georgia was built in 1962. The owners operated a department store until their retirement in the 1980s. The husband died in the 1990s and the wife died several years ago. The couple had six daughters, now scattered throughout the United States. Several clues inside hint at the couple’s once-affluent lifestyle. Sadly, now the property sits abandoned and the reason remains a mystery.

Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate
Country Estate

Country Estate

Country Estate

Country Estate

 

Countryside Estate

Country Estate

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You can find me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok. For more abandoned places from across Georgia, check out my books Abandoned Georgia: Exploring the Peach State and Abandoned Georgia: Traveling the Backroads.

12 comments

    1. It would be nice if you could buy the property and fix it back up it’s lovely it’s not that far gone it looks like it has good bones structure still looks stable

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  1. Who owns the country estate? May I have the address. Perhaps the name of who handles this. I would love to restore this.

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  2. Thanks for sharing this. I’ve lived nearby all of my life and knew the family. I used to shop at their store when I was a little girl. I’ve always loved that house and wondered what it looks like inside. It’s a shame to see it in this condition.

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  3. I grew up in SE Georgia in the 50s-60s. I had a family home that was a cut below this but which was still a big family home with most of the “fixin’s” that were expected in those days. Don’t recall having any peers that had family houses like this but had several who had grandparents who had houses like this. The 60s were boom years in the rural South. Both the Georgia and Federal governments spent money to get rural Georgians off the north end of southbound mules. There was a push to industrialization and people were making wage income never seen before in rural Georgia.

    I had a friend whose grandfather owned a house very much like this one, just around the corner from the Golf Course. Grandpa just happened to own a bank. The guy who owned a big piece of another bank and who also owned the Ford dealership owned a similar house. These days, I think both are B&Bs. There are several surviving “Timber Boom” mansions in my home town, but none of them are private homes.

    The reality is that there is almost nothing that you can do legally in a small to medium size rural town that will make you enough money to keep a house like this. Then throw in what was always the bane of the family place; they had six kids, and daughters at that. A thousand acres would make you pretty well off, but if you had to split it among six kids, it left all of them pretty much poor. If they were making the money from a department store to have that house and give a decent living to six kids in the early Sixties, by the early Seventies you were seeing your world coming to an end.

    My father was a small-town merchant in those days. I watched his struggles from the optimism of the mid-Sixties to the plant closures of the Seventies and early Eighties, and the invasion of the big-box stores. WalMart was the nuclear weapon launched against small town retail. My dad survived, barely, with niche merchandising; he sold what they didn’t; big and small sizes, odd colors, odd sizes. It is a small business and your lifestyle gets smaller and smaller. He got to go from his store to the doctor’s office, never to return.

    I can see how nobody would be willing or able to take up the burden of a house like this; there just isn’t enough money in a small Southern town for a house like this unless granddaddy left you a piece of the bank or you’ve set yourself up in the lawyer/political set.

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