The Farmhouse

According to historical records, this old plantation plain farmhouse in rural Georgia dates back to the mid 19th-century. However, some historians believe the house is possibly much older. Neighbors say the homeowner was elderly and moved to Florida to be closer to family. It appears from what’s left behind and the partially painted front, the farmhouse was in the midst of a renovation before it was left abandoned.

Abandoned Farmhouse
The overgrown yard greets visitors as they get close to the property.
Abandoned Farmhouse
The front porch was built by hand and added years after the initial construction.
Abandoned Farmhouse
Although it has been years since anyone has called this place home, inside it remains fully furnished. If you look close, you can see an animal nest in the window curtains.
Abandoned Farmhouse
Across the hall, two double beds fill the space. The wide plank wood ceiling really shows the age of the structure.
Abandoned Farmhouse
Two porcelain lamps sit side by side atop an antique dresser.

Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse
In the dining room, the table remains set. There are even a few plates among the odds and ends left behind in the cupboard.

Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

Country Living (5)

Abandoned Farmhouse

Country Living (10)

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Abandoned Farmhouse

Abandoned Farmhouse

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17 comments

    1. Thank you for sharing this great home. I pray it will not get demolished. It would be wonderful to see it restored and keep the period furniture in the decor
      I wish I had the finances to renovate it or move it to another place to be renovated . Maybe someone with funds will see it and want to save it. Fingers crossed!

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    1. I would be interested if the photographer shares the location. I wish they would so others could enjoy these places as well. Especially photographers like myself and others like yourself. Chances are if youre on here reading and looking at these photos and history you aren’t one of the ones that will vandalize such a place.

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      1. Well, he has a reputation to uphold and we all know that no one can keep a secret. It’s like the time I let two kids fish in my pond and before I knew it, I had people on my property I had never even met AND they were leaving trash behind.
        So, no, he can’t share the location.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. It would be nice if the author would mention at least the state each was located. I do realize that one should not divulge the exact location as vandals would surely desecrate these fine structures.

    Like

  2. I wonder what circumstances would make a person just walk away and leave everything as is… just hoping that it was nothing traumatic. Beautiful home.

    Like

  3. unfortunately the general public cannot be trusted to preserve anything if this wonderful photographer and historian didnt preserve the location of these places there d be nothing but graffitti and trash to find and photograph . so thank you for keeping these finds to yourself .

    Liked by 1 person

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