Banker’s House

During the Civil War, prosperity across Alabama decreased. Although Macon County was not directly involved in any military action until the latter part of the war, the loss of local manpower, the blockade of southern ports, the disruption of transportation and the general economic collapse of the South had serious economic and social repercussions in the county. However, after the war, a degree of prosperity returned to the area. As the railroads were being rebuilt, more successful businessmen began to emerge.

In 1870, the East Alabama Female College burned and the college was closed. The property was sold to the son of the county’s oldest and most successful merchant. He built this highly ornamental home on the site of the former college as a gift for his new bride. Completed in 1892, the house has an eclectic late Victorian-era design that features an asymmetrical facade, a dominant front-facing gable, overhanging eaves, and polygonal towers.

Banker's House
Constructed in the 1890s, the eclectic style is typical of the late Victorian period. Certain elements of the home, for example, the main entry transom and sidelights suggest a much earlier Greek Revival style.

Banker's House

Banker's House

Banker's House

Banker's House

Banker's House
An upstairs bathroom

Banker's House

Banker's House
All renovations have ceased and the property is currently owned by the city. A local university occasionally holds a class on historic preservation in the home.
Banker's House
Over the years, several additions were made to the home including the second-story screened in porch and this solarium on the first floor.
Banker's House
Added to the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district, these old homes paved the way for subsequent development.
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