Charred Mansion

Constructed in the late 1880s, this magnificent Queen Anne-style home in southeastern Georgia now sits abandoned. In the late 19th century, the present historic district was part of a large forest that was harvested by local settlers to provide much-needed construction materials. As the community became a growing railroad center, this wood brought substantial income to many of the local people, and eventually, so much timber was harvested that large quantities could be shipped out to Savannah and other ports.

Only after much of the forest had been cleared away was the site divided up into small blocks and developed in a relatively consistent manner as the city’s first “subdivision.” The neighborhood rapidly became popular with professional people and executives of the railroad, prominent doctors, lawyers, judges, and the like resided here. By the 1950s, this 4500-square-foot residence was divided into several apartments. Later, the property was home to an adult daycare.

The historic home was last renovated in 2010 after it was purchased by a new owner. In January 2021, the fire department was dispatched to the property after a fire was reported. Upon arrival, the rear of the house was engulfed in flames. All natural and accidental sources of ignition were eliminated through an initial investigation by the fire department who believe it was an act of arson. A $10,000 reward was offered for any information regarding the fire from the Georgia Arson Control.

Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion
Charred Mansion

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You can find me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok. For more amazing, abandoned places from across Georgia, check out my books Abandoned Georgia: Exploring the Peach State and Abandoned Georgia: Traveling the Backroads.

7 comments

  1. From the looks of the inside, it’s not hard to imagine the beauty of this home once the building of it was completed. I love the staircase and wood trim in the foyer. Sad to see fire have destroyed the back end, but it can be saved. I wonder what are the intentions for this home by the current owner? Such a beautiful piece of history, I hope to see restoration instead of demolition or it just abandoned to sit in ruin.

    Like

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