Doctor’s House

Located deep within Virginia’s remote Northern Neck peninsula, this grand Colonial farmhouse was once the home of the town doctor. The house not only served as his primary residence, but also as his family’s medical practice. After serving as a surgeon in World War II, the doctor returned to his home were he worked alongside his father at the family practice. After driving down the tree-lined circular driveway, patients would enter through a side door and navigate down a small hallway to one of the few examination rooms. Since the closest hospital was hours away, the small clinic did it all, from curing simple ailments to delivering babies. Established by his father, the medical clinic served generations of families in the community.

The local townspeople loved the doctor and whenever they saw him out they would stop and shake his hand and thank him “for that time he saved my father’s life” or ” that one time he saved my arm after a farming accident,” or whatever the case may be. Others revered him for fighting off the state when they tried to take a portion of his farmland to build a new road. The doctor took the case all the way to the Virginia Supreme Court and won, making him a hero in the eyes of locals. In his free time, the doctor seemed to have a passion for hunting. After his death, a dispute over the doctor’s will resulted in his estate being tied up in probate court. Unfortunately, the once majestic home has been allowed to languish for the past several years, with no clear future the property remains abandoned.

Doctors House

Doctor's House

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Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctors House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctor House

Doctor House

Doctor House

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Doctor'

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Doctor's House

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Doctor's House

Doctors House

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Doctors House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctors House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

Doctor's House

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12 comments

  1. Gotta love the entrance way – walking in on the (large!) wolf. With the red tones it looks like he was prepared there after the kill. 🙂

    The interior doesn’t look in bad shape at all.

    Nicely done…again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I would love to find family and ask them for ten minutes so I could save the photos from the entire house. And, the blue glass in the drs. office.

      Like

  2. I just love seeing photos of homes that had a family that loved their home and took good care of it. Your home is a part of yourself. How you wake up in the morning. Walk to the closest window and look out and see what the day would be. The leaves blowing in the trees. The birds chirping and flying from branch to branch. Just like children playing in the park. As the day passes everyone in the home does their part in making sure the home is full of happy voices. What ever needs to be taken care of in the home to keep it clean and bright is done.
    Suddenly one day the home is alone. Where did every one go? No voices with happy words. No sound of footsteps going in and out. Up and down the stairs. The home is sad. It begins to slowly die. Your photos of these once loved homes brings a heart beat to it again. When I see these photos I picture myself living in one. Keeping it alive.

    Like

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